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1.  III-Nitride photon counting avalanche photodiodes
R. McClintock, J.L. Pau, K. Minder, C. Bayram and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, January 20-25, 2008, San Jose, CA Proceedings – Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices V, Vol. 6900, p. 69000N-1-11.-- February 1, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
In order for solar and visible blind III-Nitride based photodetectors to effectively compete with the detective performance of PMT there is a need to develop photodetectors that take advantage of low noise avalanche gain. Furthermore, in certain applications, it is desirable to obtain UV photon counting performance. In this paper, we review the characteristics of III-nitride visible-blind avalanche photodetectors (APDs), and present the state-of-the-art results on photon counting based on the Geiger mode operation of GaN APDs. The devices are fabricated on transparent AlN templates specifically for back-illumination in order to enhance hole-initiated multiplication. The spectral response and Geiger-mode photon counting performance are analyzed under low photon fluxes, with single photon detection capabilities being demonstrated in smaller devices. Other major technical issues associated with the realization of high-quality visible-blind APDs and Geiger mode APDs are also discussed in detail and solutions to the major problems are described where available. Finally, future prospects for improving upon the performance of these devices are outlined. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Gas sensing spectroscopy system utilizing a sample grating distributed feedback quantum cascade laser array and type II superlattice detector
Nathaniel R. Coirier; Andrea I. Gomez-Patron; Manijeh Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 11288, Quantum Sensing and Nano Electronics and Photonics XVII, 1128815-- January 31, 2020 ...[Visit Journal]
Gas spectroscopy is a tool that can be used in a variety of applications. One example is in the medical field, where it can diagnose patients by detecting biomarkers in breath, and another is in the security field, where it can safely alert personnel about ambient concentrations of dangerous gas. In this paper, we document the design and construction of a system compact enough to be easily deployable in defense, healthcare, and chemical safety environments. Current gas sensing systems use basic quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) or distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB QCLs) with large benchtop signal recovery systems to determine gas concentrations. There are significant issues with these setups, namely the lack of laser tunability and the lack of practicality outside of a very clean lab setting. QCLs are advantageous for gas sensing purposes because they are the most efficient lasers at the mid infrared region (MIR). This is necessary since gases tend to have stronger absorption lines in the MIR range than in the near-infrared (NIR) region. To incorporate the efficiency of a QCL with wide tuning capabilities in the MIR region, sampled grating distributed feedback (SGDFB) QCLs are the answer as they have produced systems that are widely tunable, which is advantageous for scanning a robust and complete absorption spectrum. The system employs a SGDFB QCL array emitter, a Type II InAsSb Superlattice detector receiver, a gas cell, and a cooling system. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Temperature dependent characteristics of λ ~ 3.8 µm room-temperature continuous-wave quantum-cascade lasers
J.S. Yu, A. Evans, S. Slivken, S.R. Darvish and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 88 (25)-- June 19, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
The highest-performance device displays pulsed laser action at wavelengths between 3.4 and 3.6 μm, for temperatures up to 300 K, with a low temperature (80 K) threshold current density of approximately 2.6 kA/cm2, and a characteristic temperature of T0~130 K. The shortest wavelength QCL (λ ~ 3.05 μm) has a higher threshold current density (~12 kA/cm2 at T=20 K) and operates in pulsed mode at temperatures up to 110 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Focal plane arrays based on quantum dot infrared photodetectors
Manijeh Razeghi; Wei Zhang; Ho-Chul Lim; Stanley Tsao; John Szafraniec; Maho Taguchi; Bijan Movaghar
Proc. SPIE 5838, Nanotechnology II, 125 (June 28, 2005);-- June 28, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
Here we report the first demonstrations of infrared focal plane array (FPA) based on GaAs and InP based quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs). QDIPs are extension of quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) and are predicted to outperform QWIPs due to their potential advantages including normally incident absorption, higher responsivity and high temperature operation. Two material systems have been studied: InGaAs/InGaP QDIPs on GaAs substrates and InAs QDIP on InP substrates. An InGaAs/InGaP QDIP has been grown on GaAs substrate by LP-MOCVD. Photoresponse was observed at temperatures up to 200 K with a peak wavelength of 4.7 μm and cutoff wavelength of 5.2 μm. A detectivity of 1.2x1011 cm·Hz1/2/W was obtained at T=77 K and bias of -0.9 V, which is the highest for QDIPs grown by MOCVD. An InAs QDIP structure has also been grown on InP substrate by LP-MOCVD. Photoresponse of normal incidence was observed at temperature up to 160K with a peak wavelength of 6.4 μm and cutoff wavelength of 6.6 μm. A detectivity of 1.0x1010 cm·Hz1/2/W was obtained at 77K at biases of -1.1 V, which is the first and highest detectivity reported for QDIP on InP substrate. 256×256 detector arrays were fabricated first time in the world for both the GaAs and InP based QDIPs. Dry etching and indium bump bonding were used to hybridize the arrays to a Litton readout integrated circuit. For the InGaAs/InGaP QDIP FPA, thermal imaging was achieved at temperatures up to 120 K. At T=77K, the noise equivalent temperature difference (NEDT) was measured as 0.509K with a 300K background and f/2.3 optics. For the InP based QDIPs, thermal imaging was achieved at 77 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Suppression of surface leakage in gate controlled type-II InAs/GaSb mid-infrared photodetectors
G. Chen; B.-M. Nguyen; A.M. Hoang; E.K. Huang; S.R. Darvish; M. Razeghi
Proc. SPIE 8268, Quantum Sensing and Nanophotonic Devices IX, 826811 (January 20, 2012)-- January 20, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
One of the biggest challenges of improving the electrical performance in Type II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodetector is suppressing the surface leakage. Surface leakage screens important bulk dark current mechanisms, and brings difficulty and uncertainty to the material optimization and bulk intrinsic parameters extraction such as carrier lifetime and mobility. Most of surface treatments were attempted beyond the mid-infrared (MWIR) regime because compared to the bulk performance, surface leakage in MWIR was generally considered to be a minor factor. In this work, we show that below 150K, surface leakage still strongly affects the electrical performance of the very high bulk performance p-π-M-n MWIR photon detectors. With gating technique, we can effectively eliminate the surface leakage in a controllable manner. At 110K, the dark current density of a 4.7 μm cut-off gated photon diode is more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than the current density in SiO2 passivated ungated diode. With a quantum efficiency of 48%, the specific detecivity of gated diodes attains 2.5 x 1014 cm·Hz1/2/W, which is 3.6 times higher than that of ungated diodes. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Recent performance records for mid-IR quantum cascade lasers
M. Razeghi; Y. Bai; S. Slivken; S. Kuboya; S.R. Darvish
Terahertz and Mid Infrared Radiation: Basic Research and Practical Applications, 2009. TERA-MIR International Workshop [5379656], (2009) -- November 9, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
The wall plug efficiency of the mid-infrared quantum cascade laser in room temperature continuous wave operation is brought to 17%. Peak output power from a broad area (400 μm x 3 mm) device gives 120 W output power in pulsed mode operation at room temperature. Using a single-well-injector design, specifically made for low temperature operation, a record wall plug efficiency of 53% is demonstrated at 40 K. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Effects of substrate quality and orientation on the characteristics of III-nitride resonant tunneling diodes
Z. Vashaei, C. Bayram, R. McClintock and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, San Francisco, CA (January 22-27, 2011), Vol 7945, p. 79451A-- January 23, 2011 ...[Visit Journal]
Al(Ga)N/GaN resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) are grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The effects of material quality on room temperature negative differential resistance (NDR) behaviour of RTDs are investigated by growing the RTD structure on AlN, GaN, and lateral epitaxial overgrowth GaN templates. This reveals that NDR characteristics of RTDs are very sensitive to material quality (such as surface roughness and dislocations density). The effects of the aluminum content of AlGaN double barriers (DB) and polarization fields on NDR characteristic of AlGaN/GaN RTDs were also investigated by employing low dislocation density c-plane (polar) and m-plane (nonpolar) freestanding GaN substrates. Lower aluminum content in the DB RTD active layer and minimization of dislocations and polarization fields enabled a more reliable and reproducible NDR behaviour at room temperature. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High power continuous operation of a widely tunable quantum cascade laser with an integrated amplifier
S. Slivken, S. Sengupta, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters 107, 251101-- December 21, 2015 ...[Visit Journal]
Wide electrical tuning and high continuous output power is demonstrated from a single mode quantum cascade laser emitting at a wavelength near 4.8 μm. This is achieved in a space efficient manner by integrating an asymmetric sampled grating distributed feedback tunable laser with an optical amplifier. An initial demonstration of high peak power operation in pulsed mode is demonstrated first, with >5 W output over a 270 nm (113 cm−1) spectral range. Refinement of the geometry leads to continuous operation with a single mode spectral coverage of 300 nm (120 cm−1) and a maximum continuous power of 1.25 W. The output beam is shown to be nearly diffraction-limited, even at high amplifier current. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Hole-initiated multiplication in back-illuminated GaN avalanche photodiodes
R. McClintock, J.L. Pau, K. Minder, C. Bayram, P. Kung and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90 No. 14, p. 141112-1-- April 2, 2007 ...[Visit Journal]
Avalanche p-i-n photodiodes were fabricated on AlN templates for back illumination. Structures with different intrinsic layer thicknesses were tested. A critical electric field of 2.73 MV/cm was estimated from the variation of the breakdown voltage with thickness. From the device response under back and front illumination and the consequent selective injection of holes and electrons in the junction, ionization coefficients were obtained for GaN. The hole ionization coefficient was found to be higher than the electron ionization coefficient as predicted by theory. Excess multiplication noise factors were also calculated for back and front illumination, and indicated a higher noise contribution for electron injection. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Thermal Conductivity of InAs/GaSb Type II Superlattice
C. Zhou, B.M. Nguyen, M. Razeghi and M. Grayson
Journal of Electronic Materials, Vol. 41, No. 9, p. 2322-2325-- August 1, 2012 ...[Visit Journal]
The cross-plane thermal conductivity of a type II InAs/GaSb superlattice(T2SL) is measured from 13 K to 300 K using the 3x method. Thermal conductivity is reduced by up to two orders of magnitude relative to the GaSb bulk substrate. The low thermal conductivity of around 1 W/m K to 8 W/m K may serve as an advantage for thermoelectric applications at low temperatures, while presenting a challenge for T2SL interband cascade lasers and highpower photodiodes. We describe a power-law approximation to model nonlinearities in the thermal conductivity, resulting in increased or decreased peak temperature for negative or positive exponents, respectively. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Room-temperature, high-power and continuous-wave operation of distributed-feedback quantum-cascade lasers at λ ~ 9.6 µm
S.R. Darvish, S. Slivken, A. Evans, J.S. Yu, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 88 (20)-- May 15, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
High-power continuous-wave (cw) operation of distributed-feedback quantum-cascade lasers is reported. Continuous-wave output powers of 100 mW at 25 °C and 20 mW at 50 °C are obtained. The device exhibits a cw threshold current density of 1.34 kA/cm2, a maximum cw wall-plug efficiency of 1% at 25 °C, and a characteristic temperature of ~190 K in pulsed mode. Single-mode emission near 9.6 μm with a side-mode suppression ratio of ≥ 30 dB and a tuning range of 2.89 cm–1 from 15 to 50 °C is obtained. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High performance InAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIP) on InP by MOCVD
W. Zhang, H. Lim, M. Taguchi, S. Tsao, J. Szafraniec, B. Movaghar, M. Razeghi, and M. Tidrow
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, Vol. 5732, pp. 326-- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
Inter-subband detectors such as quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIP) have been widely used in infrared detection. Quantum dot infrared photodetectors (QDIPs) have been predicted to have better performance than QWIPs including higher operation temperature and normal incidence detection. Here we report our recent results of InAs QDIP grown on InP substrate by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The device structures consist of multiple stacks of InAs quantum dots with InP barriers. High detectivities in the range of 1010cm·Hz1/2/W were obtained at 77K. The measurements at higher temperatures show better temperature dependent performance than QWIP. However, the performances of QDIPs are still far from the expected. One of the reasons is the low quantum efficiency due to the low fill factor of quantum dots layer. Resonant cavity enhanced QDIP has been studied to increase the quantum efficiency. Different schemes of mirrors using free carrier plasma and distributed Bragg reflector are discussed. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  RT-CW: widely tunable semiconductor THz QCL sources
M. Razeghi; Q. Y. Lu
Proceedings Volume 9934, Terahertz Emitters, Receivers, and Applications -- September 26, 2016 ...[Visit Journal]
Distinctive position of Terahertz (THz) frequencies (ν~0.3 -10 THz) in the electromagnetic spectrum with their lower quantum energy compared to IR and higher frequency compared to microwave range allows for many potential applications unique to them. Especially in the security side of the THz sensing applications, the distinct absorption spectra of explosives and related compounds in the range of 0.1–5 THz makes THz technology a competitive technique for detecting hidden explosives. A compact, high power, room temperature continuous wave terahertz source emitting in a wide frequency range will greatly boost the THz applications for the diagnosis and detection of explosives. Here we present a new strong-coupled strain-balanced quantum cascade laser design for efficient THz generation based intracavity DFG. Room temperature continuous wave operation with electrical frequency tuning range of 2.06-4.35 THz is demonstrated [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Photoluminescence characteristics of polar and nonpolar AlGaN/GaN superlattices
Z. Vashaei, C. Bayram, P. Lavenus, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 97, No. 12, p. 121918-1-- September 20, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
High quality Al0.2Ga0.8N/GaN superlattices (SLs) with various (GaN) well widths (1.6 to 6.4 nm) have been grown on polar c-plane and nonpolar m-plane freestanding GaN substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Atomic force microscopy, high resolution x-ray diffraction, and photoluminescence (PL) studies of SLs have been carried out to determine and correlate effects of well width and polarization field on the room-temperature PL characteristics. A theoretical model was applied to explain PL energy-dependency on well width and crystalline orientation taking into account internal electric field for polar substrate. Absence of induced-internal electric field in nonpolar SLs was confirmed by stable PL peak energy and stronger PL intensity as a function of excitation power density than polar ones. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Continuous wave, room temperature operation of λ ~ 3μm quantum cascade laser
N. Bandyopadhyay, Y. Bai, S. Tsao, S. Nida, S. Slivken and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, Vol. 8631, p. 86310M-1, Photonics West, San Francisco, CA-- February 3, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs), operating in continuous wave (CW) at room temperature(RT) in 3-3.5 μm spectral range, which overlaps the spectral fingerprint region of many hydrocarbons, is essential in spectroscopic trace gas detection, environment monitoring, and pollution control. A 3 μm QCL, operating in CW at RT is demonstrated. This initial result makes it possible, for the most popular material system (AlInAs/GaInAs on InP) used in QCLs in mid-infrared and long-infrared, to cover the entire spectral range of mid-infrared atmospheric window (3-5 μm). In0.79Ga0.21As/In0.11Al0.89As strain balanced superlattice, which has a large conduction band offset, was grown. The strain was balanced with composite barriers (In0.11Al0.89As /In0.4Al0.6As) in the injector region, to eliminate the need of extremely high compressively strained GaInAs, whose pseudomorphic growth is very difficult. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Back-illuminated solar-blind photodetectors for imaging applications
R. McClintock, A. Yasan, K. Mayes, P. Kung, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Conference, Jose, CA, Vol. 5732, pp.175-- January 22, 2005 ...[Visit Journal]
Back-illuminated solar-blind ultraviolet p-i-n photodetectors and focal plane arrays are investigated. We initially study single-pixel devices and then discuss the hybridization to a read-out integrated circuit to form focal plane arrays for solar-blind UV imaging. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  A Review of III-Nitride Research at the Center for Quantum Devices
M. Razeghi and R. McClintock
Journal of Crystal Growth, Vol. 311, No. 10-- May 1, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
In this paper, we review the history of the Center for Quantum Devices’ (CQD) III-nitride research covering the past 15 years. We review early work developing III-nitride material growth. We then present a review of laser and light-emitting diode (LED) results covering everything from blue lasers to deep UV LEDs emitting at 250 nm. This is followed by a discussion of our UV photodetector research from early photoconductors all the way to current state of the art Geiger-mode UV single photon detectors. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Sandwich method to grow high quality AlN by MOCVD
Demir , H Li, Y Robin, R McClintock, S Elagoz and M Razeghi
Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics 51, pp. 085104-- February 7, 2018 ...[Visit Journal]
We report pulsed atomic layer epitaxy growth of a very high crystalline quality, thick (~2 µm) and crack-free AlN material on c-plane sapphire substrates via a sandwich method using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. This sandwich method involves the introduction of a relatively low temperature (1050 °C) 1500 nm thick AlN layer between two 250 nm thick AlN layers which are grown at higher temperature (1170 °C). The surface morphology and crystalline quality remarkably improve using this sandwich method. A 2 µm thick AlN layer was realized with 33 arcsec and 136 arcsec full width at half maximum values for symmetric and asymmetric reflections of ω-scan, respectively, and it has an atomic force microscopy root-mean-square surface roughness of ~0.71 nm for a 5  ×  5 µm² surface area. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  GaN-based nanostructured photodetectors
J.L. Pau, C. Bayram, P. Giedraitis, R. McClintock, and M. Razeghi
SPIE Proceedings, San Jose, CA Volume 7222-14-- January 26, 2009 ...[Visit Journal]
The use of nanostructures in semiconductor technology leads to the observation of new phenomena in device physics. Further quantum and non-quantum effects arise from the reduction of device dimension to a nanometric scale. In nanopillars, quantum confinement regime is only revealed when the lateral dimensions are lower than 50 nm. For larger mesoscopic systems, quantum effects are not observable but surface states play a key role and make the properties of nanostructured devices depart from those found in conventional devices. In this work, we present the fabrication of GaN nanostructured metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) and p-i-n photodiodes (PIN PDs) by e-beam lithography, as well as the investigation of their photoelectrical properties at room temperature. The nanopillar height and diameter are about 520 nm and 200 nm, respectively. MSMs present dark currents densities of 0.4 A/cm2 at ±100 V. A strong increase of the optical response with bias is observed, resulting in responsivities higher than 1 A/W. The relationship between this gain mechanism and surface states is discussed. PIN PDs yield peak responsivities (Rpeak) of 35 mA/W at -4 V and show an abnormal increase of the response (Rpeak > 100 A/W) under forward biases. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Room-temperature continuous wave operation of distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers with watt-level power output
Q.Y. Lu, Y. Bai, N. Bandyopadhyay, Sl Slivken, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 97, No. 23, p. 231119-1-- December 6, 2010 ...[Visit Journal]
We demonstrate surface-grating distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) with a watt-level power output at 4.75 μm. A device with a 5 mm cavity length exhibits an output power of 1.1 W in room-temperature cw operation. Single-mode operation with a side mode suppression ratio of 30 dB is obtained in the working temperature of 15–105 °C. A double-lobed far field with negligible beam steering is observed. The significance of this demonstration lies in its simplicity and readiness to be applied to standard QCL wafers with the promise of high-power performances. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  High-power λ ~ 9.5 µm quantum-cascade lasers operating above room temperature in continuous-wave mode
J.S. Yu, S. Slivken, A. Evans, S.R. Darvish, J. Nguyen, and M. Razeghi
Applied Physics Letters, 88 (9)-- February 27, 2006 ...[Visit Journal]
We report high-power continuous-wave (cw) operation of λ~9.5 μm quantum-cascade lasers to a temperature of 318 K. A high-reflectivity-coated 19-μm-wide and 3-mm-long device exhibits cw output powers as high as 150 mW at 288 K and still 22 mW at 318 K. In cw operation at 298 K, a threshold current density of 1.57 kA/cm2, a slope efficiency of 391 mW/A, and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 0.71% are obtained. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Demonstration of a 256x256 Middle-Wavelength Infrared Focal Plane Array based on InGaAs/InGaP Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetectors (QDIPs)
J. Jiang, K. Mi, S. Tsao, W. Zhang, H. Lim, T.O'Sullivan, T. Sills, M. Razeghi, G.J. Brown, and M.Z. Tidrow
Applied Physics Letters, 84 (13)-- April 29, 2004 ...[Visit Journal]
We report a demonstration of an infrared focal plane array based on InGaAs/InGaP quantum dot infrared photodetectors. The middle-wavelength infrared quantum-dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) structure was grown via low-pressure metal organic chemical vapor deposition. A detectivity of 3.6×1010 cm·Hz½/W was achieved at T = 95 K and a bias of –1.4 V. The background limited temperature of our QDIP was 140 K with a 45° field of view. A 256×256 detector array was fabricated with dry etching, and hybridized to a Litton readout chip by indium bumps. Thermal imaging was achieved at temperatures up to 120 K. At T = 77 K, the noise equivalent temperature difference was measured as 0.509 K with a 300 K background and f/2.3 optics. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Engineering Multi-Section Quantum Cascade Lasers for Broadband Tuning
Steven Slivken and Manijeh Razeghi
Photonics 3, 41-- June 27, 2016 ...[Visit Journal]
In an effort to overcome current limitations to electrical tuning of quantum cascade lasers, a strategy is proposed which combines heterogeneous quantum cascade laser gain engineering with sampled grating architectures. This approach seeks to not only widen the accessible spectral range for an individual emitter, but also compensate for functional non-uniformity of reflectivity and gain lineshapes. A trial laser with a dual wavelength core is presented which exhibits electroluminescence over a 750 cm−1 range and discrete single mode laser emission over a 700 cm−1 range. Electrical tuning over 180 cm−1 is demonstrated with a simple sampled grating design. A path forward to even wider tuning is also described using more sophisticated gain and grating design principles. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Effect of sidewall surface recombination on the quantum efficiency in a Y2O3 passivated gated type-II InAs/GaSb long-infrared photodetector array
G. Chen, A. M. Hoang, S. Bogdanov, A. Haddadi, S. R. Darvish, and M. Razeghi
Appl. Phys. Lett. 103, 223501 (2013)-- November 25, 2013 ...[Visit Journal]
Y2O3 was applied to passivate a long-wavelength infrared type-II superlattice gated photodetector array with 50% cut-off wavelength at 11 μm, resulting in a saturated gate bias that was 3 times lower than in a SiO2 passivated array. Besides effectively suppressing surface leakage, gating technique exhibited its ability to enhance the quantum efficiency of 100 × 100 μm size mesa from 51% to 57% by suppressing sidewall surface recombination. At 77 K, the gated photodetector showed dark current density and resistance-area product at −300 mV of 2.5 × 10−5 A/cm² and 1.3 × 104 Ω·cm², respectively, and a specific detectivity of 1.4 × 1012 Jones. [reprint (PDF)]
 
1.  Development of material quality and structural design for high performance type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes and focal plane arrays
M. Razeghi, B.M. Nguyen, D. Hoffman, P.Y. Delaunay, E.K. Huang, M.Z. Tidrow and V. Nathan
SPIE Porceedings, Vol. 7082, San Diego, CA 2008, p. 708204-- August 11, 2008 ...[Visit Journal]
Recent progress made in the structure design, growth and processing of Type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice photo-detectors lifted both the quantum efficiency and the R0A product of the detectors. Type-II superlattice demonstrated its ability to perform imaging in the Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR)and Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR) ranges, becoming a potential competitor for technologies such as Quantum Well Infrared Photo-detectors (QWIP) and Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT). Using an empirical tight-binding model, we developed superlattices designs that were nearly lattice-matched to the GaSb substrates and presented cutoff wavelengths of 5 and 11 μm. We demonstrated high quality material growth with X-ray FWHM below 30 arcsec and an AFM rms roughness of 1.5 Å over an area of 20x20 μm2. The detectors with a 5 μm cutoff, capable of operating at room temperature, showed a R0A of 1.25 106 Ω.cm2 at 77K, and a quantum efficiency of 32%. In the long wavelength infrared, we demonstrated high quantum efficiencies above 50% with high R0A products of 12 Ω.cm2 by increasing the thickness of the active region. Using the novel M-structure superlattice design, more than one order of magnitude improvement has been observed for electrical performance of the devices. Focal plane arrays in the middle and long infrared range, hybridized to an Indigo read out integrated circuit, exhibited high quality imaging. [reprint (PDF)]
 

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